Student protest coincides with transport halts

Last week, a student protest in London turned violent when police clashed with rioters. Over 12 arrests were made whilst local transport came to a grinding halt.

Protests

Protesting against high fees and the government’s plans to scrap student grants, thousands of students and demonstrators marched outside the Home Office in central London.

Starting as a peaceful march, the protest soon turned sour when protesters met police lines in the capital.

Rioters hurled paint outside the Home Office whilst others threw smoke bombs and attempted to push their way into the Department for Business Innovation and Skills.

Officers on the scene were said to have arrested over 12 of the protesters for public order offences after the riot subsided.

Transport strikes

Adding to the unease in the capital, transport strikes also brought travel to a halt, meaning long delays and panic.

Transport union RMT continued with their 48-hour strike on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR), which ended on Thursday morning.

Speaking about the strikes, RMT general secretary Mick Cash said:

“RMT negotiators have made every effort over the past 72 hours to resolve this dispute through negotiation but due to the sheer intransigence of the management the DLR will now face its first ever all-out strike action in the 28 years history of the railway.”

Ongoing problems

All in all, with student protests, rail strikes and bonfire night problems, it hasn’t been a particularly good few weeks for London commuters and locals. The increasing number of ongoing disruptions to transport in the capital is extremely worrying, and with night tube negotiations still ongoing, we might not see any true respite until early 2016.

With the Christmas period quickly approaching, we can only hope that these issue die down soon.

You can find out more about the recent protests and strikes over on the BBC website.

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